Honma TR20 B Irons Review

We put the stunning Honma TR20 B irons to the test in this in-depth review

Honma TR20 B Irons
(Image credit: Golf Monthly)
Golf Monthly Verdict

The Honma TR20 B irons are undoubtedly up there with the best-looking clubs ever to hit the market. They inspire confidence over the ball and in the bag, which is a big factor in this mentally draining game of ours. The feel off the forged face is incredibly soft and they offer loads of control in the right conditions. A fitting is probably the key to unlocking all the performance potential.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Exceptional looks and feel

  • +

    Great control in calm conditions

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Not as long as more forgiving iron sets

Some golfers just aren’t satisfied unless they have a blade in their hands. I’m as guilty as anyone. There is no denying the sheer beauty that comes from looking down at a set of the best blade irons

That’s why I was eager to try out the TR20 B irons from Honma. In this review, I give all my thoughts from testing: the good, the bad and everything in between. 

First of all, let’s start with the looks, and for me, this club is about as good as it gets. From a purely visual perspective, I love the slightly grainy finish that Honma has gone for with this one-piece muscleback, as well as the subtle design on the back of the blade.

Honma TR20 B Irons

While the topline is thin, the Honma TR20 B irons look great over the ball

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

And behind the ball is excellent too. While the topline is thin, they are still inviting to hit, especially as you work through the bag. The lack of offset is also a big plus in this department, but it does make the longer clubs quite intimidating. For those who want supreme looks in the mid-short irons, a combo set could be the way to go.

RELATED: Best golf irons

Onto the feel and it’s soft, very soft. To an extent, it’s what you would expect from a proper blade but it’s still impressive nonetheless. The immense feedback can, in part, be attributed to the S20C forged head, which isn’t a typical material used in club construction.

Honma TR20 B Irons

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

Middle strikes feel incredibly good, while the slightly wider surface area between the heel and toe means there is some forgiveness to work with as well. In addition, the high-toe, low-heel design gives the TR20 B a slight draw bias, which will be music to the ears of the overeager faders out there.

RELATED: Most forgiving irons

At the moment I use a set of cavity-back irons, so when it came to distance I lost out with the TR20 B. However, some of this deficit can be attributed to the fact that they are shorter than those currently in my bag, as well as the fact that they hadn't been fitted to me.

Honma TR20 B Irons

Andy Wright testing the Honma TR20 B irons

(Image credit: Golf Monthly)

The main issue I found was that I struggled to flight the ball into the wind. In flat calm conditions, they were a dream, offering up tremendous control, but into a fresh breeze, these did not perform as well as I expected. 

Again, they haven’t been optimised for my swing, which will have played a role, but no matter what I did, the ball seemed to balloon in the air. It was particularly noticeable given I play virtually all of my golf on a links course. 

Despite this, I would recommend the Honma TR20 B irons to anyone looking for a new set of blades. With looks and feel to rival anything on the market, I've no doubt getting fitted will be the key to unlocking that missing bit of performance.

Andrew Wright
Andrew Wright

A lifelong golf fan, Andy graduated in 2019 with a degree in Sports Journalism and got his first role in the industry as the Instruction Editor for National Club Golfer. From there, he went on to enjoy a spell freelancing for Stats Perform covering football, and then for RacingNews365 covering Formula 1, but he couldn't turn down the opportunity to get back into the sport he grew up watching and playing. He now covers a mixture of equipment, instruction and news for Golf Monthly's website and print title.


Andy took up the game at the age of seven and even harboured ambitions of a career in the professional ranks for a spell. That didn’t pan out, but he still enjoys his weekend golf at Royal Troon and holds a handicap of 1. As a side note, he's made five holes-in-one and could quite possibly be Retief Goosen’s biggest fan.


As well as the above, some of Andy's work has featured on websites such as goal.com, dailyrecord.co.uk, and theopen.com.