Sure-Set Training Aid Review

Joel Tadman tests out the new Sure-Set Training Aid to see how it can improve his swing.

Sure Set Training Aid Review
Sure Set Training Aid
(Image credit: Future)
Golf Monthly Verdict

Not many training aids engrain as many good golf swing habits as the Sure-Set. A neutral grip and swing plane is paired with additional width and connection, helping increase both power and ball-striking control.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Engrains lots of good feels

  • +

    Versatile for different body types

  • +

    Excellent value

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Clasps could be tighter

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The feeling of the perfect backswing, or should we say a more neutral backswing free of common faults, is something we all strive to achieve and the Sure-Set is a gadget that helps golfers experience close to what this feels like.

Sure-Set Training Aid Backswing

Sure-Set Training Aid Backswing

(Image credit: Future)

The Sure-Set golf training aid trains you on how to ‘set’ the club into the correct loaded position at the top of the swing with great width, on the right plane and with all the right angles. 

But how?

Sure-Set Training Aid Adjustable Fastener

Sure-Set Training Aid Adjustable Fastener

(Image credit: Future)

Well, it starts with the grip and golfers will appreciate how the Sure-Set comes with a moulded grip trainer to ensure you take a neutral hold on the club that is neither too strong or weak. It’s the training aid that Scottie Scheffler has been using with great success and ensures you set up with your hands and arms in the correct position.

Sure-Set Training Aid Grip

Sure-Set Training Aid Grip 

(Image credit: Future)

From there, the idea is to swing back and for the ball positioned at the end of the L-shaped device to naturally come to rest inside your lead armpit by blending the correct amount of forearm rotation, wrist hinge and shoulder turn. If the ball misses this position, you have immediate feedback that you need to make adjustments in how you move in the backswing.

Achieve it correctly and you get a magnificent feeling of width and stretch at the top of the backswing, something nearly all of the best players in the world are able to achieve on repeat due to their high levels of flexibility. From here, the idea is to maintain this feeling of width and connection into transition and then the early part of the downswing. There’s no question that the Sure-Set helps improve sequencing on the way down with the lower body leading and getting the club into a better delivery position.

Sure-Set Training Aid Loaded Position

Sure-Set Training Aid Loaded Position 

(Image credit: Future)

Not only is the Sure-Set a great way to achieve more width, which in turn should generate more power, but it also helps with swing plane too. If the hands and arms move in a way that sends the ball of the Sure-Set over or under plane, the ball will miss your armpit. By matching width of the golf swing to your turn, levels of control are cranked up a notch — everything feels so much more connected and in sync with the Sure-Set.

Sure-Set Backswing

(Image credit: Future)

The Sure-Set is versatile too thanks to an adjustable lever, which means it can cater for any arm or torso length. The benefits of the Sure-Set reach far and wide into various areas of the set up and swing, which means it offers excellent value for money. It also seems easy to take the feels that it engrains onto the golf course —there inevitably will be a transition period of getting used to your new movement patterns, but our testing has shown this to be short and well worth the investment in time.

Not many training aids engrain as many good golf swing habits as the Sure-Set. A neutral grip and swing plane is paired with additional width and connection, helping increase both power and ball-striking control.

Joel Tadman
Technical Editor

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.

One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 86 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 3.2.

Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: Titleist TSR3, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSR3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: Ping i230 4-UW

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 54°. Titleist Vokey SM9 60° lob wedge, K Grind

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2023 Titleist Pro V1x