Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer Review

In this Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate base layer review, we discuss the unique features that keep you warm and comfortable on the golf course

Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer Review
(Image credit: Zerofit)
Golf Monthly Verdict

There are lots of base layers on the market, but the Zerofit offers something different. The unique Heatrub material is very comfortable and keeps you really warm, but without making you feel overly hot - which is not something all base layers manage to achieve.

Reasons to buy
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    Provides instant warmth

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    Manages temperature super effectively

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    Suitable for many outdoor activities

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    Excellent freedom of movement

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    Five colour options

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Some might find the Heatrub material a little 'scratchy' at first

Zerofit is a Japanese sports performance brand dedicated to innovative base layer products. Although its garments are not designed purely for golf, the man behind the company, Mr Koji Higashi, is a keen single figure golfer; he became so tired of finding himself cold on the course that he set about creating a technological line of base layers.

The best golf base layers keep you warm on the course without restricting your swing. Zerofit bills the product as "twice as warm as a sweater", so we were keen to see how it performed out on the course in cold conditions. 

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Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer

(Image credit: Zerofit)
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Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer

(Image credit: Zerofit)

How tall am I/what is my build?
5ft 8.5 inches, medium build.

What do I normally wear – does it come up big/small?
Medium, so long as not too fitted. For me, Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer came up a little small so I needed to go up to a large size for this garment.

How did it fit/feel/perform?
We were really impressed. A good base layer is an essential piece of kit, especially if you play all-year round and in cold weather. However, some base layers actually leave you feeling too hot and sweaty, to the point where you feel uncomfortable mid round. 

With the ‘Ultimate’, fibres inside the garment are activated through movement, gently brushing against the skin to generate a heat that’s not just instant, but also comfortable. It has that feeling of a natural material but with the performance of what man made offers. 

We also liked how stretchy it felt, which allows you to swing freely. There was no feeling that it was sticking to the skin, and despite playing in various winter conditions - from freezing cold to fairly mild - it maintained the perfect temperature. In fact, the brand says its optimal temperature range is -10° to 10° Celsius. 

In terms of the fit, base layers are designed to be snug, but you may need to go up a size, as I did (medium up to large). However, there are lots of different fits and sizing options across Zerofit’s range, so if you don’t like a really tight fit, there are looser options available. 

Any extra details you notice?
The Zerofit logo on the neck and brand name on the sleeve complete a sporty look. The product came in a really classy cardboard box.

Zerofit Heatrub Ultimate Base Layer

(Image credit: Future)

Can you wear it off the course?
Yes, and you definitely will, especially if you enjoy spending time outdoors in the colder months. Whether your passion is golf, fishing, walking, cycling, or you spend much of the day outside working in cold conditions, you’ll certainly get a lot of use out of this base layer. 

How does it come out after the wash/do you need to iron it?
Wash it on a cool setting with like colours. After a dozen washes, there are no signs of it losing its shape. Ironing is not necessary.

Still short on warm golf clothing? Be sure to check out the best golf jackets and best golf jumpers.

Mike Harris
Mike Harris

Mike has been a journalist all his working life, starting out as a football writer with Goal magazine in the 1990s before moving into men’s and women’s lifestyle magazines including Men's Health, In 2003 he joined Golf Monthly and in 2006 he became only the eighth editor in Golf Monthly’s 100-plus year history. His two main passions in golf are courses, having played over 400 courses worldwide, and shoes; he owns over 40 pairs.

Mike’s handicap index hovers at around 10 and he is a member of four clubs: Hartley Wintney, Royal Liverpool, Royal North Devon and the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.