Ping Ketsch Mid putter review

The Golf Monthly Test Team's Ping Ketsch Mid putter review, a face-balanced, mid mallet model from the Cadence TR family that boasts Variable Depth Grooves

Ping Ketsch Mid putter
Ping Ketsch Mid putter
Golf Monthly Verdict

If you already use a face-balanced putter and want a slightly slimmer model that is still easy to align and offers forgiveness on errant strikes, the Ketsch Mid putter is a must-try

Reasons to buy
  • +

    One of the easiest mid-mallet putters on the market to align. Control of the clubface and distance from long range seemed effortless

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    The relatively loud sound at impact doesn’t quite match the soft feel you experience

The Golf Monthly Test Team's Ping Ketsch Mid putter review, a face-balanced, mid mallet model from the Cadence TR family that features Variable Depth Grooves

Key technology Ping’s Cadence TR Ketsch Mid putter is 30 per cent smaller than the original Ketsch, offering increased stability in a more compact look. It comes in two weights, thanks to changeable sole plates that fine-tune your feel. Variable- depth grooves are shallower in the heel and toe sections to help mishits travel closer to the hole. Contrasting white sight lines on the dark head help you achieve more accurate alignment. Ping is also offering a Winn oversize putter grip (£20 upcharge) for the first time, to suit those golfers who prefer a larger grip.

Will suit Golfers seeking the alignment assistance, roll properties and forgiveness of the original Ketsch, but in a slimmer size.

Golf Monthly Ping Ketsch Mid putter review

Ping’s Cadence TR family offers as much variety in shape, length and weight as any range on the market. While the face-balanced nature of the Ketsch Mid may not appear ideal for those with strong arcs, its performance was impressive nonetheless. The alignment lines appear just as prominent at address as the original to help you align and square the clubface.

Despite being only two thirds of the size, it’s at least as forgiving as the original Ketsch. It’s incredibly stable through impact and the ‘heavy’ option seemed to aid my unhurried tempo. Performance from long range was superb – a slight mishit didn’t seem to affect the amount the ball ran out – while short putts seemed to start on line almost automatically. It’s worth upgrading to the larger grip if you use a SuperStroke or similarly fat grip currently.

The Ketsch Mid also comes in both adjustable-shaft and counterbalanced options varying in price from £199 to £248.

Joel Tadman
Technical Editor

Joel has worked in the golf industry for over 12 years covering both instruction and more recently equipment. He now oversees all product content here at Golf Monthly, managing a team of talented and passionate writers and presenters in delivering the most thorough and accurate reviews, buying advice, comparisons and deals to help the reader find exactly what they are looking for. So whether it's the latest driver, irons, putter or laser rangefinder, Joel has his finger on the pulse keeping up to date with the latest releases in golf. He is also responsible for all content on irons and golf tech, including distance measuring devices and launch monitors.


One of his career highlights came when covering the 2012 Masters he got to play the sacred Augusta National course on the Monday after the tournament concluded, shooting a respectable 87 with just one par and four birdies. To date, his best ever round of golf is a 5-under 67 back in 2011. He currently plays his golf at Burghley Park Golf Club in Stamford, Lincs, with a handicap index of 3.8.


Joel's current What's In The Bag? 

Driver: Titleist TSR3, 9° 

Fairway wood: Titleist TSR3, 15° 

Hybrid: Titleist TSi2, 18° 

Irons: TaylorMade P770, 4-7 iron, TaylorMade P7MC 8-PW 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8, 50°, 54° and a Titleist Vokey SM9 60° lob wedge 

Putter: Evnroll ER2V 

Ball: 2021 Titleist Pro V1x