Tee Peg Bunker Drill for Golf

Get your bunker shot basics correct and you'll soon be splashing out with confidence as GM Top 25 Coach, Ged Walters, explains

Tee Peg Bunker Drill For Golf
(Image credit: Tom Miles)

Golf Monthly Top 25 Coach, Ged Walters offers a simple tee peg bunker drill for golf to help you escape the sand everytime

If your bunker shot basics and fundamental technique are correct you'll have a great chance to really increase your up-and-down percentage from greenside bunkers. This tee peg bunker drill for golf should certainly help...

Watch our beginner's guide to bunker play video with GM Top 25 Coach, Paul Foston...

1) Set-up essentials Most golfers know to open up their stance in the sand, but the best way to get everything right at address is to actually start by setting up square to the target. This gives you a reference point as to where you want your club to be aiming.

From this square set-up, feed the clubface around in your hands so it starts to look off to the right (perhaps around 45˚). Now turn the body and feet round to the left until the clubface returns to the square-to-target position at address.

Bunker Shot Basics

Turn the clubface round to about 45 degrees to the target

2) Wriggle those feet Because you’re in sand and want to get the club down below the ball at impact, you’ll need to wriggle the feet in. Getting the body slightly lower than the level of the sand makes it easier to take the depth of divot required, with the club entering the sand about 1.5in behind the ball.

Bunker Shot Basics

Wriggling your feet in will make it easier to take the depth of sand divot required

Place around 65% of your body’s pressure onto your lead side (the left leg for right-handers) and keep it there all the way through the swing.

Watch as GM Top 25 Coach Peter Finch explains how a bank note can help your bunker play..

3) Follow the feet Many golfers achieve this nice open position at address but then swing too much around the body. This leads to too shallow an angle of attack, and the club entering the sand too far behind the ball with disastrous consequences. You need to swing along the line of your body and toes.

Remember, you’ve pre-set the clubface to be pointing at the target, so that is where the ball will then go rather than down the line of your swing. Hinging the wrists a little early will help you get a nice wrist set to help you swing along the line.

Need more of a running bunker shot? Watch GM Top 25 Coach Andrew Reynolds explain how to play it...

4) Tee peg bunker drill for golf Good bunker play is not just about where the club enters the sand, but whereabouts it bottoms out at its lowest point. You want the deepest point of the divot to be directly underneath the ball. Tee your ball up in the sand, as shown in this photo, then swing along the line of your toes trying to hit the base of the tee.

Bunker Shot Basics

Try to hit the base of the tee

The ball should just fall into the spot were the tee was. Now place a ball on the sand and take your set-up, imagining that you can see through the sand to the base of the tee. Make the same swing, and in your mind, try to hit the base of the tee again. The tee peg bunker drill for golf is a great way to get the feel you need to play better sand shots.

Be nice and committed and keep the clubhead moving through to the finish with a smooth acceleration. The club will glide through the sand, splashing the ball out in the process.

Jeremy Ellwood
Jeremy Ellwood

Jeremy Ellwood has worked in the golf industry since 1993 and for Golf Monthly since 2002 when he started out as equipment editor. He is now a freelance journalist writing mainly for Golf Monthly across the whole spectrum from courses and Rules to equipment and even instruction despite his own somewhat iffy swing (he knows how to do it, but just can't do it himself). He also edits The Golf Club Secretary Newsletter, has authored or co-authored three books and written for a number of national papers including The Telegraph and The Independent. He is a senior panelist for Golf Monthly's Top 100 UK & Ireland Course Rankings and has played all of the Top 100 plus 89 of the Next 100. He has played well over 900 courses worldwide in 35 countries, but put him on a links course anywhere and he will be blissfully content. On his first trip to Abu Dhabi a decade ago he foolishly asked Paul Casey what sort of a record he had around the course there. "Well, I've won it twice if that's what you mean!" came the reply...

Jezz can be contacted via Twitter - @JezzEllwoodGolf