Following a number of advancements, the latest Golf Irons offer longer distances through the entire bag, but without the need to sacrifice any forgiveness 

Buyer’s Guide

Head design

Match the head shape to your ball-striking ability. Bigger cavities are forgiving and tend the launch the ball higher (but also tend to have stronger lofts), while compact heads are more workable with less of a focus on distance alone.

Get custom fitted

There’s no industry standard for things like loft and lie, so while one manufacturer’s off-the-rack standard spec may be perfect for your swing, another’s will not. Make sure you hit some shots on a lie board using sole and impact tape under the supervision of a PGA Pro to ensure your set matches your swing, rather than trying to change your swing to suit your new irons!

Offset

Offset is the distance between the leading edge and the front of the hosel. Lrger, game improvement irons tend to have more offset as it encourages the golfer to position the hands more forward at address and also gives the clubface a little extra time to rotate around to square at impact, helping those that slice the ball.

Forged or cast?

The majority of irons on the market are cast and they tend to be larger in size and offer more distance as well as a firmer feel. Forged irons offer a softer feel and greater consistency. They also tend to be more expensive as they are more labour intensive to produce.

Steel or graphite?

The main difference between steel and graphite shafts is the weight. Graphite shafts are lighter, which can help golfers swing the club faster, but are more expensive and can be less durable than their steel counterparts.

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